Tag Archive: famous artists

Famous Artist III: O’Keeffe

This session exploring different artists. To explore an artist means we examine the work as a class, draw inspiration from the colors, content and techniques and then turn it into something of our own. For O’Keeffe we discussed the color palette she used in Oriental Poppies (1928), brush stroke size, and how big she painted the…

Famous Artists I: Van Gogh Monotypes

Materials: cookie sheet washable tempera paint paper (I like white heavy weight construction or card stock) Use your hands like “Kitty paws”. This is how the paint looks before we press the paper. What your are making is a “Monotype” which means it will be a one-of-a-kind print. I like to show examples of Van…

Famous Artists II: Mondrian

Mondrian was fabous for his black grid work filled with squares and rectangles in bold primary colors. We had a blast recreating his work in our own way. I created a human size Mondrian coloring page with black masking tape on my reusable plexiglass walls. We colored in areas with washable tempera paint in the…

Famous Artists I: Matisse

Matisse’s paper cut-outs were simple but moving. His artistic choices were intentional, full of life, color, and feeling. We discussed how many of Matisse’s compositions were figurative while others focused on abstract design. Most of my students were not concerned with making figurative imagery and were content to cut and paste, exploring shape and color…

Masters of Art I: Jackson Pollock (string, marble, & pendulum painting)

Jackson Pollock’s work represents exploration with paint, movement, and self expression. He worked on a very large scale and he used his whole body to accomplish covering the canvas. I showed my students a few examples of Pollock in action and also his finished pieces. In honor of Pollock I set up three paint projects….

Masters of Art I: Picasso

In my research for projects inspired by famous artists I ran across a wonderful Picasso project on Mary Making. She rated her project for pre-K and K and I adapted it to be finished in 30 minutes and done by students as young as 18 months. Instead of having the students hand draw their own…